World hunger

first_imgJean Kinsey suggested her 2010 D.W. Brooks Lecture might well have been titled “A Tale of Two Food Cultures.” Her talk this week in Athens, Ga., on “Feeding Billions: Local Solutions or Global Distributions” concluded that sustainably feeding the world will require both.The annual lecture honors Brooks, the late founder of Gold Kist and Cotton States Insurance cooperatives and a University of Georgia graduate.“I’m struck by the need to reduce hunger, increase food production, increase sustainability and reduce transportation to deliver food,” said Kinsey, a professor of applied economics at the University of Minnesota and former director of the university’s Food Industry Center. “In a parallel universe, there are those who would say, ‘we should only eat food that was produced locally.’ Those in that camp often say that food also should be organic, animals should be treated kindly and plants shouldn’t be genetically modified,” she said.In the face of a 39 percent population growth between now and 2050 and with most of that growth taking place in developing countries, Kinsey said local food will not be enough.“In 2015 there will be 1.3 billion hungry people in the world,” Kinsey said.Demand for better foodsAs people in countries like China and India see their incomes increase, their demand for food changes.“Richer people want richer foods,” Kinsey said. “That richer food means more animal protein. They aren’t satisfied living on cereal anymore.” Increased animal production means higher demand for grain to feed these animals, she said. Acres dedicated to feed grain are not directly producing food for people. “The food-versus-fuel debate is valid also and should be examined more closely,” she said. Genetically modifiedTo feed the world, she said, genetically modified foods must be used.“Worldwide, about 10 percent of all cropland is planted in genetically modified crops,” she said. “But bans in Europe on imports of genetically modified crops have intimidated much of the rest of the world into rejecting genetically modified food, too.”Yellow rice, a highly enriched rice developed a decade ago, has never been distributed in some countries because of negative consumer reception to GMO crops.“Consumer acceptance is critical to adoption and key to the whole picture,” she said. “For example, Zambia was in a critical food situation but had to reject food aid in GMO crops or face losing their valuable vegetable market in the United Kingdom.”Organically grown?A move toward organic food has taken off in the U.S. and Europe. It began as a way to protect soils, reduce chemical residue and return to a simpler way of life. Fast growth – sales increased 20 percent per year for over 10 years – prevented the supply from meeting demand. Organic crops are grown on 4.8 million acres of U.S. farmland, she said. But it’s not enough. And companies began importing ingredients from other countries. “What China calls organic may not be the same as what we’d call organic in the U.S.,” she said.She broke another organic myth – the one that consumers paint of small, pastoral farms. “More than 60 percent of all U.S. organic farmland is farms of 500-plus acres,” she said.“And then there are the different labels,” she said. “We moved from organic to natural. Moving to natural and taking out those ingredients that are there for a reason – like preventing mold growth, micro-organism contamination and improve shelf life, means we will waste more food.”Food waste is a big problem. Americans discard half of all the food calories produced, Kinsey said. Sustainable foodOne of the biggest problems Kinsey pointed out was a lack of understanding of food labels. “Many who are passionate about sustainability lump a lot of things together that don’t necessarily fit, like all-natural, local, organic, fresh and environmentally friendly.” Reducing food miles, the miles from farm to table, is not as important as reducing the amount of energy needed to produce the crop, she said.But she encouraged the purchase of locally grown food. When it comes to feeding the world, it ultimately takes a mixture of local and global. “We can’t do it with one or the other,” she said.last_img read more

Cricket News India will dominate this WC like Aussies did in 2003, 2007, says Ashwin

first_imgChennai: Out-of-favour India off-spinner Ravichandran Ashwin on Tuesday said that Virat Kohli-led team would dominate the ongoing World Cup like Australia did in 2003 and 2007.India have posted impressive wins in both their World Cup matches so far, against South Africa and Australia.“…India will go on to dominate this World Cup like Australia did in 2003 and 2007,” the bowler said after launching the ‘Ashwin Foundation’, which aims to help young cricketers at his Gen-Next Cricket Institute.The lanky Tamil Nadu cricketer said India’s spinning duo of Yuzvendra Chahal and Kuldeep Yadav have been doing well for a while now.“Chahal and Kuldeep have been doing well for a while now. Chahal has performed well in the World Cup also,” he added.On off-spinners not being preferred in the playing XI these days, Ashwin said that things would soon change.“I think off spin is not very much (seen these days). The commodity in the game has changed. A lot of cricketers are right handers and requirement of left-arm spinners are lot more. But I think what goes comes around.“Requirement of off-spinner in shortest format has become lesser but if you look at the IPL this year it was Harbhajan Singh and myself…I did not necessarily bowl offspin, it is perception and it will change, if you give can yourself a chance,” he said.The 32-year-old informed that he would be leaving for England on June 23 to play for county side Nottinghamshire in the second half of the season. He had turned out for Worcestershire last time.“I will be leaving for England on June 23 to play for English county team Nottinghamshire. Let us see how it goes.” Meanwhile, Ashwin has handpicked eight youngsters who would be provided scholarship and kits on behalf of the foundation run by him and his wife Prithi.“As a young cricketer I always felt infrastructure and coaching standards could be better and now I’m in a position to help impart state of the art coaching methodologies to kids who have the required skill sets but don’t have the financial aid to continue their dream of playing cricket,” he said.The foundation would also aim to create awareness among trainees of Gen-Next Institute about the importance of eye donation and right to vote and safe driving. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Angels drop marathon slugfest to Astros despite two Mike Trout homers

first_imgThe game included an emotional rollercoaster in the bottom of the eighth, when the apparent go-ahead run led to a frightening injury and eventually turned into a double play that kept the game tied.The Astros had the bases loaded and one out when Springer hit a fly ball to right field. Kole Calhoun caught it and uncorked a throw to the plate. The ball reached catcher Jonathan Lucroy just as Jake Marisnick knocked him to the ground.Trainers worked on Lucroy for several minutes, as his teammates gathered around and a visibly upset Marisnick even offered support. Lucroy, his face bloody, was helped onto a cart and taken off the field.The cheers in support of Lucroy suddenly turned to boos as plate ump Mike Eastabrook called Marisnick out for violating the home plate collision rule. The call was upheld on review.Lucroy was taken to a local hospital for a CT scan, to be evaluated for a possible concussion and nose fracture. Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter “It certainly didn’t look like a clean play,” said Angels Manager Brad Ausmus, a former catcher. “I don’t know what actually happened. It looked like Marisnick took a step to the left and bowled into him with his arm up. The call was right. Major League Baseball should probably take a look at it and consider some type of suspension, quite frankly.”Marisnick said it was an unfortunate collision and he planned to reach out to Lucroy.“First and foremost I hope he’s OK,” Marisnick said. “That was a bad play. For me, I was running and I see him take a step kind of up the line like he’s going to drop and go back so I tried to take an in step and slide head first on the inside corner. And I watched the play again and it looks … he just drops right in front of me and once I kind of made a decision it was too late. And it was a bad play and I hope he’s OK.”Trout hit a pair of homers, his second multi-homer game of the week. He has hit six homers in the past five games, all of them after the shocking loss of teammate Tyler Skaggs. Trout goes to the All-Star break with 28 homers, an Angels record. Trout already had a share of the previous record, 26.“Considering what happened this week, it’s been kind of remarkable he’s been able to focus that much when he steps in the batter’s box and be this hot,” Ausmus said.Trout hit a solo homer in the sixth inning, to give the Angels a four-run lead. After that had disappeared when Cam Bedrosian gave up a grand slam to Yuli Gurriel in the bottom of the inning, Trout restored the lead with a two-run shot in the eighth.In the bottom of the inning, Ty Buttrey took the mound for his second inning of work and could not get an out. He allowed a game-tying two-run single to Yordan Álvarez.Closer Hansel Robles entered, and was on the mound when Springer hit the fly ball that led to the inning-ending double play.The Angels slugfest seemed like it might be a routine Angels victory when they scored five runs in the third inning, knocking 24-year-old José Urquidy out of his second big league game. The Angels sent 10 hitters to the plate and scored five runs, including two on Shohei Ohtani’s 14th homer of the season.They padded the lead to 7-2 with single runs in the fourth and fifth, but the Astros fought back.Related Articles PreviousHouston Astros’ Tony Kemp celebrates in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, right, collides Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy (20) while trying to score during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, right, collides Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy (20) while trying to score during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsHouston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, right, collides Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy (20) while trying to score during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, (6) collides Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy (20) while trying to score during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, left, checks on Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy after they collided at home plate during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. Lucroy was carted off the field. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy is helped by medical personnel after colliding with Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy, center, is helped by medical personnel after colliding with Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy, center, is carted off the field after colliding with Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick at home plate during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout (27) is congratulated by Shohei Ohtani (17) after hitting a home run as Houston Astros catcher Robinson Chirinos, right, looks down during the sixth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy hits an RBI triple against the Houston Astros during the fifth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy hits an RBI triple against the Houston Astros during the fifth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Luis Rengifo (4) scores as Houston Astros catcher Max Stassi (12) covers home plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ George Springer (4) steals second base as the ball gets away from Los Angeles Angels second baseman Luis Rengifo during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17) celebrates with David Fletcher (6) after both scored on Ohtani’s homer as Houston Astros catcher Max Stassi stands behind home plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Tony Kemp (18) celebrates with Tyler White (13) after both scored on Kemp’s homer against the Los Angeles Angels during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17) celebrates with David Fletcher (6) after both scored on Ohtani’s homer as Houston Astros catcher Max Stassi stands behind home plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Jose Suarez throws against the Houston Astros during the first inning of baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Tony Kemp celebrates in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, left, celebrates with Kole Calhoun after hitting a two-run home run against the Houston Astros during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani hits a two-run home run against the Houston Astros during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17) is congratulated by third base coach Mike Gallego after hitting a two-run home run against the Houston Astros during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Tony Kemp, right, hits a two-run home run as Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy reaches for the pitch during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Tony Kemp celebrates in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, right, collides Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy (20) while trying to score during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)NextShow Caption1 of 23Houston Astros’ Jake Marisnick, right, collides Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy (20) while trying to score during the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Houston. Marisnick was called out under the home plate collision rule. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)ExpandHOUSTON — The Angels certainly could use four days off now.On the final day before the All-Star break, the Angels blew a five-run lead, wasted two more homers by Mike Trout and saw another player suffer an injury in a grueling 11-10, 10-inning loss to the Houston Astros on Sunday.The Angels, who were trying to win two of three from the first-place Astros as they headed to the break, had a five-run lead in the fifth and then a two-run lead in the eighth.The Astros eventually won it on George Springer’s RBI single in the 10th, ending the 4-hour, 49-minute marathon. Taylor Cole had allowed a leadoff double to Josh Reddick and then Springer’s hit. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone center_img Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros José Suarez had started for the Angels and weaved his way around eight baserunners while recording just 10 outs. He had allowed two runs. In the fourth, Manager Brad Ausmus pulled Suarez just as he was about to begin the third time through the order.At that point, Ausmus had five fresh relievers who had been pitching well enough to hold leads lately. But managerial plans can’t withstand ineffective relievers.Through the ninth inning, Ausmus ran through Noé Ramírez, Justin Anderson, Bedrosian, Buttrey and Robles. Ramírez, Bedrosian and Buttrey all gave up runs before Robles pitched two scoreless — but eventful — innings to get the game to the 10th.In all, Angels pitchers allowed 19 hits.“Our bullpen has been a strength for us all year,” Ausmus said. “They just had a bad day. A couple of our guys had an off day on the same day and it happened to be the day before the break. It’s a little sour taste in our mouths, but these guys have earned their off days here over the next four. We’ll come back on Friday.”last_img read more

NBA champion Stephen Jackson opens up about friendship with George Floyd during ‘Today’ interview

first_img“I haven’t been the same since I’ve seen it.”Watch @craigmelvin’s full interview with Stephen Jackson, a former NBA player and lifelong friend of George Floyd, who died while in Minneapolis police custody. pic.twitter.com/4qsdbBMxeB— TODAY (@TODAYshow) May 28, 2020“We’re going to get change. This is not right. Some kind of way we have to figure this out,” Jackson said. “Because you don’t want — Americans, you don’t want us pulling the ‘you’ on you.”You don’t want the people you’ve been brutalizing, the people you’ve been treating like trash, you don’t want them to turn around and do that on you. And that’s why America’s so scared of us. But we’re not going to do that. We come from a place of love … I’m going to get justice for my friend.”MORE: LeBron references Kaepernick protest after death of George FloydFloyd died Monday after a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, kept a knee pressed against Floyd’s neck for an extended period as he was prone on the street, periodically pleading for help and exclaiming he was having difficulty breathing.All four officers at the scene, including Chauvin, were fired by the Minneapolis police department.”For five straight minutes a white officer on our police department pressed his knee into the neck of a black man who was handcuffed, who was no threat and was articulating very clearly how he was impacted, how his physical health was being damaged and how he couldn’t breathe,” Mayor Jacob Frey told CNN.Frey has said the action used against Floyd in pinning his head to the ground is contrary to department policy, and he wants criminal charges brought against the officer.Melvin spoke to Jackson about the point in the videotape of Floyd’s arrest that he cries for his mother, who had passed away two years earlier. Jackson responded emotionally, “It hurt, because I knew that was a cry for help. I’m a black man, and I’m a strong black man, and I knew Floyd. That’s a cry for help. We don’t scream our mother’s name like that unless we know something is wrong and our life is in jeopardy … and we can’t control it.”“I knew that was a cry for help… we don’t scream our mother’s name like that unless we know something is wrong and our life is in jeopardy,” Stephen Jackson says about video of his friend, George Floyd. pic.twitter.com/ea98wo2A9i— TODAY (@TODAYshow) May 28, 2020A second night of protests in Minneapolis late Wednesday in response to Floyd’s death turned violent. One person was shot and killed. An auto parts store and construction site were set on fire. A department store and several other businesses were looted.Asked what Floyd would think of these protests, Jackson said, “He would be happy that the people are fighting for him, but that’s not the way he’d want them to do it. He’d want the people responsible for his death penalized. He wasn’t the type of people to hurt innocent people. We were the same type of people … We’d ride and see a homeless person, and if we can’t do nothing for him, we’ll get emotional. So this is not what Floyd would want. Floyd would want everybody standing together and fighting for justice. And that’s it. He’s not the type of person to promote violence.” Jackson played 14 seasons in the NBA, winning a championship with the Spurs in 2003, and now is a basketball analyst for ESPN. He said his friendship with Lloyd was “meant to be.” They were introduced by a mutual friend and came to call each other “Twin.” Jackson described Floyd as his “best friend.”Jackson said he was sent the video of Floyd being restrained by his girlfriend’s mother and did not immediately recognize that it was his friend on the ground.Stephen Jackson explains how he found out about the death of his lifelong friend, George Floyd. pic.twitter.com/YFG1fDY079— TODAY (@TODAYshow) May 28, 2020“I was thinking it’s just another video that’s she’s sending me, another black man getting murdered by the police. And I didn’t really pay attention to it,” Jackson said. “As I clicked out of the message, I had 50 messages, and I clicked on one of them from my friend, Mike D, and it said: ‘You see what they did to Twin in Minnesota?’ And I jumped up, screamed, scared my daughter, almost broke my hand punching stuff because I was so mad … It just destroyed me, and I haven’t been the same since I’ve seen it.” “Change is going to start with George Floyd.”NBA champion Stephen Jackson said much about his longtime friend, George Floyd, during a six-minute interview Thursday morning on NBC’s “Today” show, successfully fighting back tears at one point during his conversation with co-host Craig Melvin. His most salient message, though, was the hopeful declaration that Floyd’s death at the hands of police will be the last of these cases that have turned men such as Rodney King, Eric Garner, Philando Castile and now, George Floyd, into household names not for what they did, but what was done to them.last_img read more

Thundery downpours to batter Donegal as Met Eireann issue Status Yellow warning

first_imgA status yellow rain warning has been issued for Donegal as heavy downpours are set to strike the county. Met Eireann has warned of a risk of localised flooding due in certain areas due to the incoming persistent rain.There is the risk of heavy thundery downpours on Monday from 12pm to 4pm, especially over Munster and Leinster which may lead to spot flooding. There will be heavy thundery downpours this afternoon and evening, especially over Munster and Leinster which may lead to spot flooding. Becoming warm with top temperatures of 18 to 22 degrees in light variable or northeasterly breezes. pic.twitter.com/2EpnbMUIv2— Met Éireann (@MetEireann) June 24, 2019Thundery downpours to batter Donegal as Met Eireann issue Status Yellow warning was last modified: June 25th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

3 tips for finding Mystery Caches

first_imgMystery Caches can be a bit of a, well, mystery! Known as Puzzle or Unknown caches as well, Mysteries are a “catch-all” geocache type that involves solving puzzles in order to decode the correct cache coordinates or crack secret clues to unlock a cache’s stash.With varying degrees of difficulty, it can be daunting trying to figure out where to start with Mystery Caches. That’s why we’re sharing three tips* to help you solve those Mysteries and add another smiley to your find count!  *Sneak Peek: one of these involves updates to our solution checker! Work your way upStart easy by tackling Mystery Caches that have a one or two star difficulty rating. The more caches you conquer over time, the more tricks of the trade* you’ll pick up and the easier it’ll become.*Such as invisible ink (white text), hints in the source code, and clues in the name! Gather your Mystery CrewTwo heads are better than one! Bring your geocaching pals along, not only is geocaching more fun when you have your buddies but they can help you brainstorm through those extra tricky questions. Confirm your coords with our Mystery solution checker!This simple tool helps geocachers ensure they solved for the correct coordinates before they go to find the final container. Last October, we released a basic solution checker for Mystery Caches on Geocaching.com and we’re excited to announce a few improvements! The solution checker has now been updated to a single field, making it easier to input or paste your coordinates:Mystery Caches are fun way to spice up any geocaching adventure while sharpening the geocaching saw. Plus, if it’s still chilly where you call home, Mystery Caches are the perfect activity. For now, sit by the fire and solve some tough puzzles and when the weather warms up, you’ll have a whole new set of caches to find!Do you love a good Mystery? Tell us about your puzzling geocaching experiences or share your favorite puzzle-solving tips! Be careful not to reveal any cache spoilers.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedDon’t Miss Out on Pi Day! Top Tips for Mystery CachesMarch 4, 2015In “Geocaching Info”Top Tips for Puzzle CachesAugust 12, 2014In “Learn”How to solve Mystery Caches (also known as Puzzle Caches)March 21, 2018In “Learn”last_img read more

Attributes of the Helping Professional

first_imgWhich attribute is most important?I find this wheel to be a useful tool for professional reflection and growth.  It begs the question, “Which attribute is most important?”Of course, I know that all of the attributes are important.  But, if we stop there, we have not really examined anything, and the wheel is just nice graphic and little more.  The real magic occurs when we take the time to really think about out which attribute may be most important.  It leads us to evaluate the importance of each one of the attributes in the work that we do.  It also requires us to think about how families that we work with see us.  We begin to consider how displaying a particular attribute may impact our ability to establish trust with families and ensure the best possible outcomes.Try this experiment.  Take a minute to think about a helping professional who provides important services for you or a close family member.   You may think about a doctor who provides healthcare when you are sick, a school teacher who works with your child, or some other key helping professional in your life.  Which attribute from the list do you believe is most important for them to display when working with you?  Which attribute, if not displayed, would represent a deal breaker for you?  For example, how would you handle a teacher working with your child each day who is unable to display a basic level of emotional maturity, or a counselor who us unable to display empathy?Now, think about your work in providing services.  Rank the attributes on the wheel in order with the one that you display most consistently ranked first and the one you display least consistently ranked last.  Thinking about this carefully may take a few minutes.  How do these attributes impact your effectiveness in working with families?  Which attributes were at the bottom of your list?  Are there attributes that you believe you can ignore in your work?  How might displaying all of the attributes help you in your work?This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on September 4, 2015.last_img read more

Separating Jagga and Balia: How AIIMS doctors separated high-risk twins from Odisha

first_imgPuspanjali Kanhar, 33, vividly remembers the first time she took her newborn twins to her village Milipada, located in the lush green tribal belt of Kandhamal district in Odisha. She was nervous and frightened. Hers were no ‘ordinary’ twins, they were joined at the head. The entire village gathered around her in curiosity. Puspanjali also recalls her own horror and confusion when she saw her children for the first time. “The doctors and nurses called out to each other when they realised in the middle of the delivery that everything wasn’t going as expected,” she says. “The delivery itself was tough. I was in a lot of pain. When they showed me the children, I screamed.” She pauses. “I couldn’t cradle them. I couldn’t breastfeed them. They had to be given feeding bottles. After a few months in the hospital, we went home with the twins.”That unexpected day was April 9, 2015. Puspanjali had no idea then that her twins would go into history books two years later. On August 28, 2017, a battery of doctors working round the clock at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) in New Delhi began the extraordinarily complicated process of separating the twins, Jagannath (Jagga) and Balaram (Balia). There was nervousness and expectation in the air; the stakes were high. But three months and two major surgeries later, the doctors were successful. Following their separation, Jagga and Balia were kept under observation in Delhi for two years. Now they are back in Odisha, in the busy Srirama Chandra Bhanja Medical College and Hospital in Cuttack, over 260 km from Milipada, where they are undergoing care and rehabilitation. Jagga and Balia are still subjects of curiosity everywhere, but in a different way now: they are famous as the country’s only surviving twins who were craniopagus conjoined and then separated. They are being hailed by some as little medical marvels. ‘I was terrified’ While their mother speaks to me near the window of the hospital room of Srirama Chandra Bhanja, the stronger of the twins, Jagga, is busy singing the English alphabet and staring at a book that he is holding upside down. “Jagga is calm, curious and easygoing, while Balia is moody. Jagga loves to interact with people; Balia is more reserved,” says Puspanjali. For Puspanjali, Milipada has been her home for as long as she can remember. She had never stepped out of the confines of her village until the time she was taken to the city hospital in Phiringiya in Kandhamal district 10 days before the babies were due. Milipada is a village without a motorable road, where most women deliver at home. When the time comes, midwives are summoned, the baby is delivered, and the umbilical cord cut.“My two other boys were delivered at home, and this was to be no different,” Puspanjali recalls. “But I felt a strange uneasiness towards the final term of my pregnancy. I was in severe pain in the last 15 days before the delivery. That’s when my husband Bhuyan and I took a ride down to the city hospital.” Bhuyan does odd jobs and the family does not have a steady source of income. “I don’t remember a lot about the trip, except that I was in constant pain,” she continues. “I walked some distance and when I got tired, we hired an auto to reach the hospital. Doctors assured us that everything was fine, but I felt uneasy. A midwife at the Phiringya hospital who had massaged me told me that I was carrying twins. But nothing prepared me for what was to follow. We decided to stay back near the hospital instead of heading back to the village that day. Coming to the hospital again would have been too expensive and physically demanding.” “Immediately after the delivery at the city hospital, a nurse told me that we had been blessed with twins,” Bhuyan joins in. “She then said they were fused together, and that the doctors were wondering what to do. I could not comprehend what she was saying and kept asking her about my children. She took me to see the children. I was terrified. I could not even begin to imagine the medical strain and turmoil that awaited us. I started crying,” he says. Puspanjali and Bhuyan took their twins back to their village in Kandhamal, to a devastated family. Bhuyan’s mother, however, got over the shock and took to the children almost instantly. She fed them, initially in a bottle and then with a spoon, and bathed them, even as Puspanjali was recovering from the normal delivery that wasn’t easy.One in 25 lakh The twins were often taken to the city hospital for treatment. The doctors there realised that Jagga and Balia were high-risk babies. Even attempting an invasive intervention could prove fatal for both. Admitting that the case needed a skilled, collaborative effort for any favourable outcome, they referred the children to AIIMS. The twins were first brought to the Delhi hospital in July 2017, aged two, with a combined weight of 20 kg. They underwent a series of tests.  Twins joined at the head are rare. AIIMS records only 116 such births since 1912, of which both the twins in the set survived only in 15 cases. “Craniopagus is the rarest form of conjoined twins with an overall occurrence rate of 0.6 per million births,” says A.K. Mahapatra, the co-lead of the final surgery. S.S. Kale, the head of department of neurology at AIIMS, says that these twins are always genetically identical and thus same sex, which is often female. (The female to male ratio among these babies is 4:1.) “Race, maternal age, heredity or environmental reasons are not known to cause this. Relatively few craniopagus twins survive the perinatal period — approximately 40% of the twins are stillborn and an additional 33% die within the immediate perinatal period, usually from congential organ anomalies,” he says. “We knew that the stakes were very high,” says Deepak Gupta, professor of neurosurgery and head of the team that separated the twins on October 25 after a 25 hour-long surgery that brought together 125 doctors and support staff from AIIMS. Together with the first surgery of 20 hours, the combined surgery time to separate the twins was 45 hours. The Odisha government sanctioned ₹1 crore for the surgery. It continues to bear the costs of treatment and rehabilitation. AIIMS has now returned ₹80 lakh to the Odisha government. It charges the twins only for medicines and equipment that are not available with the State government. It was with many medical personnel, advanced technology, intensive research and practice sessions, and countless hours of care that the medical team at AIIMS performed what is being called a breakthrough in the medical fraternity the world over. “The world was watching us. Our success has put India on the world map. Of course, the fact that we would save the lives of two children was our driving force. There were times when we hit lows, yet our team persisted,” Gupta says.Paediatricians Rakesh Lodha and Sheffali Gulat add: “The goal was to ensure the best outcome for these little boys. When Jagga responds to us positively, and when we see him growing, the struggle seems like an opportunity to learn more.” Separation and complicationsThe doctors explain the case. Jagga and Balia shared brain tissue and venous sinus and needed two invasive procedures before their final separation. “Technological developments helped,” says Gupta. 3-D prints and models were made after preliminary investigations for drawing the road map to operate. The world over, neurosurgeons use a high-definition 3-D imaging device to see inside the brain during surgery, allowing them to map safer pathways to reach and remove tumours.In the first phase of the surgery, doctors created a venous bypass to separate the veins returning blood to the heart from the brain of the twins. In the final separation, skin grafting and minor neurosurgical procedures were done by the plastic surgery team to cover skin defects. But despite their “best-laid plans and despite having the best brains and hands on the operation table during the final separation”, Jagga suffered a cardiac arrest during the surgery, Gupta says. That adversely affected his renal system. “He required dialysis for some time. And Balia suffered seizures which caused intellectual impairment,” he says.“During the final separation, our cardiac and neuro-anaesthetists played a very important role in pulling Jagga through,” he continues. “In the last few hours of the marathon 20-hour surgery, Jagga’s heart stopped after being physically separated from his twin. When that happened, our cardiac anaesthesiologist Sandeep Chauhan resuscitated the child for almost 35 minutes non-stop and brought him back to life again.”  In the final surgery, the twins’ head skin flaps were covered.The long road aheadA year after the surgery, AIIMS considered discharging the boys. “But parents and State authorities weren’t sure if they would be able to provide the best for the children. So we decided to host them for some more time,” says Maneesh Singhal, a plastic surgeon at the hospital. After coordination with the Odisha government, the twins were taken to Cuttack in September by train, after a lot of preparation and teary farewells in Delhi. Though separated, the twins have a long medical, developmental, and social battle to win, for a semblance of normal life to begin. For one, they will need hospital assistance for care and rehabilitation, and going back to their village any time in the near future seems impossible, say the hospital staff at AIIMS. They will also need skin grafts and extensive physiotherapy to allow them a good quality of life. Besides this, other challenges too await the boys. Jagga, 4, has to go to school and needs to wear a special helmet to protect the part of his skull that has to grow back. This will protect him from falls and injuries. He has to avoid contact sports, says Singhal. “He will need strong psychosocial support and rehabilitation during his growing phase. He will also undergo cranioplasty [surgical repair of a bone defect in the skull],” says Gupta. Besides the medical challenges, the boys are still to get to know their family, especially their two older brothers, Dhaitya, 10, and Ajit, 8. “They have to relearn the normal life of a child — play with children of their age, have social interactions with family, friends and neighbours and even pets. They have to basically outgrow their hospital way of life,” Gupta explains. While Jagga is “thriving”, Balia is currently battling chest infection after the duo was discharged from AIIMS over a month ago. He is on ventilator support. Balia will need a lot of time to recover from his neurological status and needs special supportive care for a few years at least, say doctors.‘Maybe God has a plan’ Jagga lives with his parents on the second floor of the same hospital unit where Balia is undergoing treatment. Given all these challenges ahead, “I don’t know where life is going,’’ says Puspanjali as she helps Jagga drink his milk. She speaks of both of them lovingly, sharing little details of their development. Like any child, Jagga is fussy about the food he eats. “He loves fish fry, chicken and flavoured milk.” Nobody is allowed to mess with Jagga’s prized possession, a multicoloured plastic ball with which he plays every day. Walking around in his helmet, Jagga is like any other four-year-old — he cannot wait to play with his older brother who recently visited him at the hospital. The twins recovering after their surgery in AIIMS, Delhi.  | Photo Credit: PTI center_img The couple’s older children Dhaitya, 10, and Ajit, 8, in their village Milipada in Kandhamal district of Odisha.  | Photo Credit: Biswaranjan Rout For Puspanjali, life has been full of twists and turns and surprises. She describes her journey to Delhi: “It was like a foreign country!” But the kindness of the staff there made things easy, she says. “We were told before every operation that either or both the children may not survive, but I was sure that I wanted them to be separated. They could not have lived like that. Maybe God has a plan. I hope he has a good plan because we have no plan, no idea, no resources of our own,’’ she says. Despite all the odds and hardship and the constant fear that her twins may not survive, Puspanjali says that the struggle has been worth it. “I can’t remember how we descended from the hills of my village and came to Delhi with nothing but hope. The doctors at AIIMS told us that this is the children’s destiny. Nurses also say that God will show us the way forward,” she says.Puspanjali and Bhuyan also miss their home. “We have been out for over 700 days now. We don’t know if we will finally take back our children alive from here,” says Bhuyan.“I miss my bed, the food there, my pond, and I miss having a life without so much chaos and uncertainty,” says Puspanjali, in the broken Hindi that she has picked up in Delhi. Back in Milipada, villagers feel that the twins’ arrival has also drawn the attention of the State government to the condition of the village. The villagers are protective of the twins. “Poverty has driven my children and grandchildren away from us when we need them the most. But we wish them a good life and all the comfort that we can’t even imagine. If not anything else, they will at least have good food once a day and access to a hospital when they are sick. That itself is a miracle,” says the boys’ grandfather, Turuda.Spotlight on KandhamalThe case has also put the spotlight on Kandhamal. The district has about 810 inaccessible villages that can only be reached by foot. This is why most women deliver at home. But things are also changing for women like Puspanjali. The district is showing admirable growth in institutional delivery, following interventions by the State government. Use of bike ambulances, delivery vans and ‘Janani’ autorickshaws have helped Kandhamal shed its ‘backward’ tag and emerge at the top of the 30 districts in Odisha, says a State health official. The government estimated a 103% rise in institutional deliveries in Kandhamal from April to July this year. This was the highest rate of institutional deliveries in the State, and higher than the State average of 76% during this period, the official says. Puspanjali and Bhuyan hope to go back some day to this improved district, where everyone waits for them eagerly. “We are totally dependent on charity for our children’s survival. While Jagga is making progress, Balia isn’t doing well. I know that Balia may not make it, but I feel that at least one of my children should have a better life than me,” Puspanjali says.last_img read more

Reyes lauds Gilas composure vs ‘skilled, talented’ Japanese

first_imgCPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Read Next ONE: Iniong’s win streak ends with UD loss to Yamaguchi Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohortcenter_img “It was important that when they came back and even got the lead, we stayed calm and did not panic,” said Reyes. “I think that’s the important part of the game, that the players remained positive and that allowed us to eventually get the victory.”Gilas Pilipinas will now return home as they prepare for a duel against Chinese Taipei on Monday at Smart Araneta Coliseum. The Philippines lost hold of an early 14-point lead as Japan came out of the halftime break more determined and managed to get ahead, 40-37.The furious fightback from the home team didn’t surprise Reyes one bit, especially with the likes of Makoto Hiejima, Yuki Togashi, and naturalized player Ira Brown backstopping the Japanese. teamFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We knew we had to contain guys like Togashi and Hiejima, and we knew what Ira Brown can do. But outside of the three, it’s a deep team and guys like (Daiki) Tanaka, (Tenketsu) Harimoto, and (Takatoshi) Furukawa gave them a big lift tonight. All of those guys, we had to be very conscious of and we had to devise a gameplan for them. It’s the kind of team Japan is, it’s a deep team, skilled, talented, and very well-coached,” he said.Luckily for the Philippines, Jayson Castro and Andray Blatche were there to stabilize the ship as the shots finally went in the end that even against the Akatsuki Five’s best efforts, Gilas held on to the win. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Andray Blatche was one of the stabilizing force for the Philippines in its win against Japan. Photo from Fiba.comEven though Gilas Pilipinas enjoyed double-digit leads in its 77-71 win over Japan on Friday, the visiting Filipinos never felt complacent knowing how potent the home team is.“We have a very high respect for Japan and we knew that were in for a tough match,” he said after the victory to start its 2019 Fiba World Cup Asian qualifying bid. “When we had a nice lead, we know that they have the ability to come back because they’re a quality team.”ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

UK’s Tony Barbee Blocking Auburn Fans On Twitter Who Remind Him That He Never Won An SEC Tournament Game

first_imgTony Barbee blocking Auburn fans on Twitter.Former Auburn coach Tony Barbee, now an assistant with Kentucky, never won an SEC Tournament game in his four years on campus. Barbee’s Tigers also never won more than six conference contests in a season. Apparently, with Auburn winning its first two games of the 2015 SEC Tournament under new coach Bruce Pearl, a few Tigers fans are poking a bit of fun at him on Twitter. Barbee’s response? He’s blocking them. Via Fansided:Just like he blocked us from being good at basketball, am I right?! pic.twitter.com/5FG31gVoyQ— Drunk Aubie (@DrunkAubie) March 12, 2015Nice! pic.twitter.com/DJw1hFw5j0— Kris Colvin (@kmcolvin10) March 12, 2015Tony Barbee clearly doesn’t appreciate my reminiscing about our time together. #WarEagle pic.twitter.com/9HRgb7zoHV— Carter Michaels (@TheRealCMike) March 12, 2015″@captaindeas: @Clintau24 @VarnerBeast14 Someone isn’t happy with me… pic.twitter.com/FJeCAzmF63″About time! Welcome!— Clint Richardson® (@Clintau24) March 12, 2015Tony Barbee blocked me too guys! Lol— AUHoopsBlog (@AUHoopsBlog) March 12, 2015Apparently the C&M account is blocked by Tony Barbee. I consider that awesome.— College & Magnolia (@CollegeAndMag) March 12, 2015Friday, after Kentucky’s win over Florida, the school reportedly did not make Barbee available to the media. It’s a strange move that’s been criticized by many. Tony Barbee was unavailable in Kentucky’s locker room. Only applies to players at UK.— James Crepea (@JamesCrepea) March 13, 2015Despite the SEC policy being for “all coaches and student-athletes” to be available for interviews at the SEC Tourney, UK feels otherwise— James Crepea (@JamesCrepea) March 13, 2015Ironically, if Auburn can knock off LSU later today, the Tigers will get the Wildcats in the next round.last_img read more